Health

Jojoba Oil Uses

Jojoba oil, which is pronounced “hohoba oil,” is an oil indigenous to North Mexico and South of the United states. It’s a waxy substance rather than a liquid that is commonly harvested from plants. The unrefined version of jojoba oil is usually gold tinged while refined versions are always clear. Jojoba oil has a wide number of commercial uses today which include:

11 Benefits of Jojoba Oil for Skin & Hair - How to Use Jojoba Oil

Moisturizing agent

Jojoba oil sets itself apart from all other essential oils by being probably the best plant-based moisturizer on the planet. Ever since the ban on whale oil in the 1970’s, it has been seen as a good replacement. Whale oil was primarily used as an emulsifier (helps with the interaction of a variety of chemicals) and an emollient (Skin moisturizers). As such, the cosmetics industry scrambled to find a suitable replacement at the time chebe powder.

They found many suitable plant-based substitutes such as those derived from the jojoba and coconut tree. Today, its products are used in soaps, skin creams, shampoos and even acne treatments. When applied to the skin (Massaged in), it has the ability to moisturize without clogging up our pores. This is particularly useful when dealing with dry skin issues such as eczema and various forms of dermatitis.

It also works as a scalp conditioner. While some manufacturers use a bit of it in their hair products for the same effect, it is usually more cost-effective to purchase pure jojoba oil on its own. It should be applied and massaged on to the scalp before shampooing. This helps the hair retain oils that are otherwise stripped out by the shampoo. It is an effective treatment for dandruff as dandruff is merely dermatitis of the scalp. It should be noted that too much of it will make your hair somewhat greasy. For an added “Kick” to your hair conditioners, a few drops will suffice.

Aromatherapy

Jojoba oil can used as a carrier oil as most of the ingredients used in aromatherapy (Lavender, peppermint) are rather volatile (They evaporate easily). When exposed, they tend to oxidize, which can destroy the therapeutic properties they carry. The same is not true for jojoba oil as it is very resistant to oxidation and has a very long shelf life because of it. There are a variety of carrier oils used in aromatherapy which include rosehip, sweet almond, coconut and Argan oil. All of them have their own characteristics when used for such purposes For those looking to infuse a skin moisturizer into their concoction, there is no better carrier oil than jojoba oil and coconut oil.

Agriculture

Jojoba oil is a natural fungicide. As such, it can be used for organic farming alongside neem oil and tea tree oils for pest and fungal control. For the home garden, it can be used in a spraying mechanism to achieve the same effect. It is typically diluted with water to use as a fungicide. It is also seen as a viable alternative to diesel. This is because it contains less carbon than fossil fuels in general.